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6 Reasons Why You Always Feel Hungry, According to Dietitian

Your stomach is growling in the middle of a Zoom meeting — again. While using mute may additionally keep others from hearing your hunger pains, it can be frustrating to feel hungry all the time.




Being constantly hungry can be caused by lack of protein, fiber and fat in your diet. Not getting enough sleep or being stressed can additionally affect your appetite. Registered dietitian Julia Zumpano, RD, talks about why you may additionally constantly feel hungry and how certain foods can help you feel full for longer.


Why you’re feeling hungry all the time

Hunger typically sets in after two hours from the last time you’ve eaten a meal.


“You’re actually feeling physical signs of hunger, so your stomach is growling, your energy is dropping,” says Zumpano. “You might additionally feel a little low on energy, maybe jittery.”


On the other hand, emotional hunger doesn’t show any physical signs. This is when you might have cravings for certain foods. Zumpano estimates that about 90% of us engage in emotional eating.


“If you’re saying, ‘I want chocolate. I want a bag of chips,’ that’s not hunger,” says Zumpano. “Usually, you’re searching for food and food doesn’t satisfy because you’re feeding an emotional hunger.”


You’re not consuming enough protein

Protein is one of the three macronutrients your body needs (carbohydrates and fats being the other two) to give you energy. When used together in a meal, they can help fuel your body and keep you feeling full.


For example, a meal heavy on carbs will cause your sugar to spike and then decrease leading to hunger.


“When you include protein with a complex carbohydrate, it slows down the rate of glucose. This means you’ll have a gradual increase and then a gradual decrease, which makes you feel more settled and satisfied,” says Zumpano.


And think beyond meat when looking for protein to add to your meals. Vegetables, dairy products like yogurt, milk and cheese, eggs, fish, beans, tofu, seeds and nuts all have protein.


You’re not sleeping well

If you’re not getting the recommended seven to 9 hours of sleep a day, it can lead to weight gain. Sleep helps regulate ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone. Not getting enough sleep will increase gherlin, leading you to feel hungry when you’re actually in need of sleep.


“Sleep is ideal to get your body system to heal and regenerate,” says Zumpano. “So if you can’t get sleep throughout the night, taking a short nap or even just resting your body can help.”


You’re eating refined carbs

Watch out for foods made with refined carbs like white flour or white rice (and yes, foods like candy and baked goods contain refined carbs).


Those ingredients have been processed and lose many of their nutrients and fiber. Eating too many refined carbs doesn’t leave you feeling full for long. In fact, it spikes your blood sugar and then when it drops, you’re hungry again.


“We tend to crave carbs and sugar because every time we have a little bit, our energy level rises. So when you’re tired, you’re using your food to create energy as opposed to your natural sources of energy,” says Zumpano.


Your diet is low in fat

Adding foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids like salmon, tuna, sardines, walnuts or flaxseed can help with your appetite.


But if you’re lacking healthy fat in your diet, it can lead to craving carbs and foods high in sugar. So consider that balance of what you eat — it all goes back to needing those three macronutrients to feel full and satisfied.


“Those macronutrients are designed so that we need all three,” says Zumpano. “It’s just slightly increasing your healthy fats to the point where you feel that level of satiety.”


Your diet needs more fiber

Fiber is so good for so many reasons. But when it comes to hunger, look for foods high in fiber like fruits, vegetables, lentils, beans and oats to help release appetite-reducing hormones.


“Fiber expands in your belly,” says Zumpano. “It stimulates that feeling of being full earlier.”


Originally published: Cleveland Clinic

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